Sunday, 8 February 2015

Dog trainers/animal control, Pit Bull breeders, owners, fanciers, experts, animal behaviorists, Vets, Doctors

For additional accurate information on the public safety Danger of Pit Bull Type Dogs visit:

http://www.dogsbite.org/

http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/

http://www.animals24-7.org/category/dogs-cats/dogs/
*************************************************************************

Dog trainers/animal control, Pit Bull breeders, owners, fanciers, experts


MARK WULKAN, MD, surgeon at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

"There is a difference with the pit bulls. In the last two years we've seen 56 dog injuries that were so severe the patient had to be admitted to the hospital so this doesn't count just a little bite and then goes to the emergency room. Of those 56, 21 were pit bulls. And then when we look at our data even further, of the kids that were most severely injured, those that were in the hospital for more than 8 days or had life threatening injuries, 100% of those were pit bulls.

STEPHEN COHN, MD, professor of surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center

“I think this is a public health hazard, this particular dog. We just have to have them contained in a way that protects the general public. I don't want to see another kid come in dead.”

JOHN BINI, MD, chief of surgery at Wilford Hall Medical Center

“There are going to be outspoken opponents of breed legislation, who say: ‘My pit bulls lie with my baby and play with my rabbit.' And that's fine. I just think we're seeing something here, and I think it does warrant a discussion as to whether this is a risk that a community wants to take.”

MORTALITY, MAULING, AND MAIMING BY VICIOUS DOGS, April 2011 Annals of Surgery

“Fortunately, fatal dog attacks are rare, but there seems to be a distinct relationship between the severity and lethality of an attack and the breed responsible,” they wrote in an article published in the April issue of the medical journal Annals of Surgery. “These breeds should be regulated in the same way in which other dangerous species, such as leopards, are regulated.”

DAVID E. BLOCKER, BS, MD, Dog Bite Rates and Biting Dog Breeds in Texas, 1995-1997

Bite Rates by Breed page 23

One out of every 40 Pit Bulls (2.5%) and about one out of 75 Chow Chows (1.4%) generated a reported human bite each year (Table 29; Figure 7).

One out of 100 Rottweilers (1%) caused a reported bite, and less than one out of 250 German Shepherds (0.37%) bit a human each year, not statistically different from the average for all dogs combined (0.53%).

Huskies, Dobermans, and Australian Shepherds had bite rates slightly lower than German Shepherds but higher than Labrador Retrievers.

Less than one in every 500 Labrador retrievers (0.15%) was associated with a reported bite each year. All other breeds examined individually, including Poodles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds, had bite rates lower than Labrador Retrievers.

Odds ratios for each of the five most commonly biting dog breeds versus all others presented similar findings (Table 30). The odds of a Pit Bull in Bexar County causing a bite were 5 times greater than the odds for all other breeds combined, at 4.9 to 1.

Chow Chows and Rottweilers also had odds ratios significantly greater than the average, at 2.9 to 1 and 1.8 to 1, respectively. The odds ratios for German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers were significantly lower than the average, at 0.67 to 1 and

0.26 to 1.

PETER ANTEVY, pediatric E.R. physician, Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital

Dr Antvey sees at least five dog-bite victims a month in his emergency room. Unfortunately, he said, "the biggest offender is the pit bull."

MELISSA ARCA, MD

The reality is that any dog can bite, and statistically speaking, a child is most likely to be bitten by the family dog or a dog that they know. When you're talking about bite severity resulting in life-threatening and even fatal injuries, pit bulls and Rottweilers are the main culprits.

Experience absolutely colors our perception, and in this case I can't help but be affected by what I've seen. I will never forget a young child I treated in the ER during my pediatric residency. She suffered severe facial lacerations and tears to her face after a pit bull attack in her local park.

****************************************************************************
Benjamin Hart, professor emeritus at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and an animal behaviorist, said he wasn't surprised by dog behaviorists positive assessment's of pit bull type dogs after attacks.

"It's quite common for a pit bull to show no signs of aggression," Hart said Wednesday. "People will call it a nice dog, a sweet dog, even the neighbors - and then all of a sudden something triggers the dog, and it attacks a human in a characteristic way of biting and hanging on until a lot of damage is done."

Hart said pit bulls are responsible for about 60 percent of dog attack fatalities each year, which is "way out of proportion" compared with other breeds. Pit bulls make up less than 5 percent of the American dog population.

"It's very poor policy to allow any child around a pit bull, in my mind, let alone climb on a dog," Hart said.
*********************************************************************************************************
The pit bull's unusual breeding history has produced some bizarre behavioral traits, de- scribed by The Economist's science editor in an article published a few years ago, at the peak of a heated British controversy over dangerous dogs that saw the pit bull banned in England.

First, the pit bull is quicker to anger than most dogs, probably due to the breed's unusually high level of the neurotransmitter L-tyrosine. Second, pit bulls are frighteningly tenacious; their attacks frequently last for 15 minutes or longer, and nothing—hoses, violent blows or kicks—can easily stop them.

That's because of the third behavioral anomaly: the breed's remarkable insensitivity to pain. Most dogs beaten in a fight will submit the next time they see the victor. Not a defeated pit bull, who will tear into his onetime vanquisher. This, too, has to do with brain chemistry.

The body releases endorphins as a natural painkiller. Pit bulls seem extra-sensitive to endorphins and may generate higher levels of the chemical than other dogs. Endorphins are also addictive: "The dogs may be junkies, seeking pain so they can get the endorphin buzz they crave," The Economist suggests.

Finally, most dogs warn you before they attack, growling or barking to tell you how angry they are—"so they don't have to fight," ASPCA advisor and animal geneticist Stephen Zawistowski stresses.

Not the pit bull, which attacks without warning. Most dogs, too, will bow to signal that they want to frolic. Again, not the pit bull, which may follow an apparently playful bow with a lethal assault.

In short, contrary to the writings of Vicki Hearne, a well-known essayist on animals who—in a bizarre but emotionally charged confusion—equates breed-specific laws against pit bulls as a kind of "racist propaganda," the pit bull is a breed apart


MIKE JOYNER –
“As a judge in Environmental Court who has had to deal with numerous cases of dog on dog and dog on human attacks, I can without any bias say that pit bulls are a dangerous breed. The facts speak for themselves. You cannot argue against the data.

My wife owns a doggie daycare and I have dealt with every possible breed. In the six years she has been opened there have been over 1600 dogs that have been through the doors with the exception of the pit bull. Her liability insurance company will not insure her if she takes pit bulls, and as much as I love ALL dogs I do not trust pit bulls around children or other dogs.

I have been on the bench for several cases where a pit bull attacked a child and literally pulled the scalp off of a 12 year old girl’s head. It was a neighbor’s dog and she had pet it a week before the incident, which occurred in her own backyard with the pit bull jumped the fence and attacked her without any provocation or warning. I have had numerous cases where a pit bull attacked another dog and held it down or shook it until it was dead…even in the presence of the owner of the pit bull who could do nothing to separate the dogs.

"Knowing what I know I would be negligent if I promoted pit bulls as pets to any family with children or neighbors with pets."