Monday, 9 February 2015

Examples of successfully Enforced Pit Bull Type Dog Bans & BSL.

For additional accurate information on the public safety Danger of Pit Bull Type Dogs visit:

http://www.dogsbite.org/

http://www.daxtonsfriends.com/

http://www.animals24-7.org/category/dogs-cats/dogs/
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Examples of successfully Enforced Pit Bull Type Dog Bans & BSL.

In the Summer of 2013, Riverside County supervisors unanimously passed an ordinance requiring pit bulls older than 4 months in unincorporated areas of the county to be spayed or neutered. Registered breeders, law enforcement and therapy dogs are exempt from the ordinance, which takes effect next month.

In 2010, San Bernardino County supervisors passed a similar ordinance for unincorporated areas of the county, such as Mentone. Owners of non-sterilized pit bulls can be fined $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second and $300 for subsequent offenses.

Highland and Yucaipa adopted the same ordinance, according to Brian Cronin, chief of the county’s animal control division, which handles animal control in those two cities.

The San Bernardino County ordinance said pit bull breeds account for about 20 percent of the dogs at animal shelters and are put down more often than any other breed.

Cronin emailed figures showing the county’s intake of pit bulls has decreased 28 percent since the ordinance took effect and that euthanization rates have dropped by 56 percent.

In August 2011, San Bernardino County Animal Care and Control, which oversees unincorporated areas and Highland and Yucaipa, reported a 9.6 decrease in dog bites after enacting a pit bull sterilization law in 2010.

The law, approved unanimously by the Board of Supervisors last week, expands upon an ordinance approved last year that requires pit bull owners to spay or neuter their pets.

Supervisor Neil Derry introduced the original proposal in response to an increasing number of attacks by pit bulls in recent years that resulted in four deaths -- two of them young children -- in the last five years.

The county saw a 9.6 percent decrease in dog bites in the year since the spay/neuter program was instituted, said Brian Cronin, the county's animal care and control division chief.

The ordinance was passed to reduce the number of dogs destroyed at taxpayer expense, Cronin said.

HAS MANDATORY S/N FOR PITS WORKED FOR SAN BERNARDINO, CA?
YES!!

The following is the six (6) year trend for Pit Bull admissions and euthanasia of this specific type/breed of dog in County owned or operated animal shelter facilities:

FY 2007-08 Admissions 1,623 Euthanized 1,276 (78.6% of intake)

FY 2008-09 Admissions 1,705 Euthanized 1,321 (77.4%) of intake)

FY 2009-10 Admissions 2,066 Euthanized 1,593 (77.1% of intake)

FY 2010-11 Admissions 2,523 Euthanized 1,632 (64.6% of intake)

FY 2011-12 Admissions 2,265 Euthanized 1,085 (47.9% of intake)

FY 2012-13 Admissions 1,815 Euthanized 727 (40% of intake)

You will note, the percentage of Pit Bull type dogs euthanized has been significantly reduced since the implementation of the San Bernardino County Mandatory Pit Bull sterilization ordinance.

The ordinance was implemented in fiscal year 2010-11 in which Pit Bull admissions hit an all time high of 2,523. Last year Pit Bull admissions were at 1,815.

This is a significant reduction in admissions for this type of dog after the ordinance was passed. You can not argue that spay/neuter hasn't had a positive impact
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9/10/2013

Bites by pit bulls have dropped dramatically since 2004
Hearing on Alix's leash law violation put off to Sept. 20

PAWTUCKET - The city has seen a dramatic decline in the number of attacks by pit bulls since a 2004 ban on the breed went into effect, according to data released by local officials.

In response to an open records request by The Breeze, the Pawtucket Police Department and Pawtucket Animal Control, through City Solicitor Frank Milos, provided documents showing just how rarely pit bulls have attacked people or animals in the city since the ban was enacted.

For the four years leading up to the ban, from 2000 to 2003, officers responded to 71 incidents of biting or scratching involving pit bulls in Pawtucket, a majority of those, 51, involving attacks on people.!

In the 10 years since the ban was put in place, police responded to 23 total attacks involving pit bulls, with only 13 of those involving attacks on people.

For three years, 2008, 2010, and 2012, there were no attacks by pit bulls reported, according to the information provided by the city.

The following are the 71 pit bulls attacks separated out by year for the four years before Pawtucket's pit bull ban went into effect:

* 2000 - 20 incidents, 18 involving attacks on people, two involving other animals.

* 2001 - 14 incidents, nine involving attacks on people, five on animals.

* 2002 - 17 incidents, 14 involving attacks on people, three on animals.

* 2003 - 20 incidents, 11 involving attacks on people, nine on animals.

The following are the 23 pit bull attacks in the city for the 10 years since Pawtucket's pit bull ban was unanimously approved by the Rhode Island General Assembly:

* 2004 - Eight incidents, five involving attacks on people, three involving attacks on other animals.

* 2005 - One incident involving a person being attacked.

* 2006 - Three incidents, one involving an attack on a person, two on animals.

* 2007 - Four incidents, one involving an attack on a person, three on animals.

* 2008 - No incidents.

* 2009 - Two incidents, both involving attacks on people.

* 2010 - No incidents.

* 2011 - Two incidents, both involving attacks on people.

* 2012 - No incidents.

* 2013 - Three incidents, one involving an attack on a person, two on animals.

John Holmes, Pawtucket's veteran animal control officer and the key proponent of the 2004 ban, said the numbers before and after 2004 "speak for themselves."

"The law's worked," he said. "We didn't put this law in to destroy pit bulls, in fact, quite the opposite."

The last serious pit bull attack in Pawtucket was the day the bill was signed into law, said Holmes. Residents have been safer because of the ban, he said.

"Public safety has always been the issue," he said. "They're just missing so much of what this is all about. We're going backward here."
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Wichita, Kansas

In January 2009, the Wichita Department of Environmental Services released a number of pit bull statistics. The figures are based upon the Wichita Animal Control department's investigation of 733 dog bites in 2008.

Included in the data are pit bulls encountered by the Wichita Police Department. In the 1-year period, 95% of police encounters with aggressive dogs were pit bulls.

The report also showed that the percentage of pit bull encounters had increased from 66% in 2004 to 95% in 2008. Subsequently, four months after the release of this data, the City of Wichita enacted a mandatory pit bull sterilization law.

55% of all dogs deemed dangerous were pit bulls (41 pit bull dogs deemed dangerous).

34% of attacks and bites involved pit bull dogs (246 pit bull attacks/bites).

28% of dogs found running at large were pit bulls (1,279 pit bulls found running loose).

25% of dogs impounded were pit bulls dogs (1,575 pit bulls impounded).

37% of all dogs euthanized were pit bull dogs (1,255 pit bulls euthanized).

23% of dog complaints involved pit bull dogs (2,523 complaints involved pit bull dogs).